Veni, Vidi, Lusi, Vici 


Veni, Vidi, Lusi , Vici- I came, I saw, I played, I won!

 If my son had a Latin motto it would be this! Julius Caesar take a back seat! 

There is none so fierce as a 16 year old boy determined to play cricket like a pro.  A flight was taken to another time zone.  Night time lows and day time highs were navigated with unintrusive help. Carbs were counted pretty successfully. The results of each game (read ‘battle’) were dissected on the side of the field.  Whilst cricketing tactics were openly discussed, my boy waged a silent campaign.  

He fought off heat, then cold. He made intricate decisions based on activity levels. The war, however, was not won by type 1 diabetes. My boy owned his diabetes and he dominated it!   He took a big step towards independence. The team performed well in a tough pool but the actual results of the games don’t really matter as the real victor is safely tucked up in his bed, back home with us, smiling to himself and reliving  moments of glory on the field.

Diabetes Queen  Mothers 

Diabetes Queen Mother

When your child is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it is the loneliest feeling in the world! For me, it was the first time that I couldn’t wave my magic maternal wand and make something nasty and unwanted disappear. Other than health professionals (who can be amazing) there is generally no one to tell you what to do or help you help your child. Whilst it is your child who has diabetes and not you, you are their primary caregiver and as such are reponsible for them. This can feel all consuming.

A year after my son’s diagnosis, I discovered the diabetes online community. I read lots of blogs and found that I wanted to write my own. I am really clear when I write that it’s not me who has diabetes. I do not reveal my son’s name and I don’t post photos of him on my blog or on twitter. That is my choice, as I know my boy and he is private about his diabetes. 

It is hard as a parent to know what your online profile should be. Clearly, most of us do not actually have diabetes but it is such a big part of our lives whether our children are five or fifteen. I often feel hypocritical for even writing about diabetes as I don’t have it, but it can dominate my life and I do enjoy the connections I have made with people online, especially some other mums.

As 2017 comes to close,  I have seen the amazing phenomenon that is Constance Hall (read about it here). I follow what Constance does on Facebook. It’s so fantastic how she tells it like it is and connects with women across the globe with her total honesty and humour. I don’t need to agree with everything she does and says.  Her success comes from talking about how life really is. She hides nothing and people love this about her. Women being there for each other is not new but using social media to do this is a relatively new phenomenon.

With this in mind, I would like to pay homage and respect to the Diabetes Queen Mothers out there. There are many ways to be a Diabetes Queen Mother. None are wrong. I realise that some mums do things differently from me: some share much more than I would, others are more focused on research, and my own way of coping is to try to be realistically optimistic and focus on hope. 

We are all different yet we are all connected by Type 1 Diabetes and together we are stronger. It’s not our task to critique or question each other. We are not digital natives and we can be clumsy and awkward.  We don’t have solutions or cures but we have real, lived experiences of helping our children grow into strong, independent young adults. We need not always agree but we are Diabetes Queen Mothers.

Who are my Diabetes Queen Mothers? 

(In no particular order)

carbcountingkids.com

@carolynboardman (on Twitter)

@cstevens338 (On twitter)

Bigfootchildhavediabetes.com

Brightoneagle.wordpress.com

T1dandgf.wordpress.com

Acornishmum.com

Racheljgood.wordpress.com

@deepost30 (on twitter)

WaltzingTheDragon.ca

actuallymummy.co.uk

I’ve focused purely on Diabetes Queen Mothers in this blog. That is not to take away from the Diabetes Queens and Kings out there who inspire and teach us every day in many, many ways.


The Boy and the Egg Cross a Continent 


(I love this bust. I call it ‘Mother of Boys’. I saw it in a Château in the Loire Valley and immediately identified with her facial expression.)

Anyway, back to this blog!

Off he goes, cricket bat in one hand, Egg in the other! That’s my boy and, in my eyes, he is a champion before he has even left.

Being selected for the school’s First 11 cricket team was an honour, playing in the local school comp was fun and then came the cherry on the cake: the opportunity to join the team in a competition on the other side of Australia! 

First of all, what is it about bloody cricket and blood glucose levels? I sit on the side lines on a Saturday : a true martyr, looking just like the picture above. I’ve given up even trying to pick which child is mine, let alone try to understand the rules. Then comes the post match analysis of the game.  I smile, and adopt a Madonna-esque ( not pointy bra Madonna) facial expression and try to nod in the right places. Following this, we try to figure out the randomness of the BGLs (this time potty mouth Madonna can make an appearance) and we are stumped. (Hey, look, a cricket metaphor!).

Last week, wearing a CGM (funded by the local diabetes clinic) was a seemingly fantastic solution to working out what was going on. Great idea until there was an allergic reaction to the film keeping the CGM in place. Cue much frantic itching and the appearance of a nasty rash. A new CGM was put on after the weekend and was able to be kept on until the end of the week. The poor boy did have another allergic reaction but had kept quiet about it and soldiered on. The information gleaned from the wearing of the CGM has meant that the amount of insulin used around games can now be tailored much more precisely.

Challenge number one, was making sure the teacher leading the group had an awareness of Type 1 diabetes and was trained to use glucagon. This took some organising from our Diabetes Educator. She said her session with the teacher was fantastic and that the teacher was floored by what my son has to do every day. It is wonderful that he sees him as a ‘normal’ boy and he is, but there is so much work goes on, especially around sport, to make that happen. Now the teacher gets it, I can be confident in him being a good back up for my boy.

The next challenge was to find a family who would billet my boy. A lovely lady has put her hand up. Her sibling has Type 1 diabetes and her son is in the host school’s team . She has volunteered to do the 3am wake up so BGLs can be checked after a big day of cricket in the sun, presumably backed up with swims and back yard cricket. She is getting in all the hypo snacks needed and has sent texts checking we are all good to go. I am unbelievably grateful to this family. This had been my biggest worry as my boy sleeps through night time hypos. I am pretty tough and don’t cry often but I bawled my eyes out with sheer relief after I spoke to this lady.

After the school and accommodation were sorted, we needed to go through the action plan. We rocked up Friday afternoon to the local diabetes clinic. This date coincided with my son’s three year ‘diaversary’. On the way to the appointment, I really wanted my son to reflect on how amazing, fantastic and all round bloody wonderful he has been. As we drove, we chatted about all that had happened in those three years and I let him know in very clear terms how proud his dad and I are of him. 

My boy knows what he needs to do. He can carb count like a pro. He has a great knowledge of how to manage his diabetes. My hope is that, with all this knowledge and a good back up team, he can focus on having fun and playing some good cricket.

So here we are. Tomorrow is preparation day. Cricket gear needs to be pristine. Good clothes for going out folded. Full school winter uniform including blazer hung up ready to wear travelling. Then lastly we will go through the diabetes kit. A lesson on how to use the Frio packs, triple checking that there is enough gear to last a week and then we will wave him off in the wee small hours of Tuesday.