Life is good


When an unwelcome visitor, such as Type 1 diabetes, comes and takes residence in your family, life changes. Things feel really serious for a while as you get to grips with counting carbs, calculating insulin doses and helping your child deal with the reality of living with Type 1 diabetes. All of this takes time.

My way of dealing with it was to keep life simple and not put too much pressure on myself. Feeling tired from initial nightly testing backed up with a full time, busy job meant I didn’t socialise as much as I had before. I’d see a few friends but not as many as previously.

  

Two years into this journey, it was time for some fun! What a great afternoon was had. Around fifty fab females arrived, dressed in black and white, bearing silent auction items, extra bottles of bubbly and above all a desire to have a laugh and raise money for a good cause.


Jellybean count – 194 painstakingly counted jelly beans. Two jars!

Dahlias for diabetes! I made about 15 different dahlias and sold them all. I think I should have charged double as they were snapped up pretty quickly!

This was such a great way to reconnect with all my extended friendship group. We had such a fun afternoon,  eating, laughing, drinking prosecco to the backdrop of a sunny Australian afternoon and the beat of a Seventies playlist on Spotify. Most of my favourite things in one place.

I didn’t involve the men in the House of Testosterone but on Saturday morning the lawn was mown, the vegie garden was weeded, bunting was hung up and the whole place looked like you want your home to look like all the time. They certainly did come through for me.

The next morning, I counted up the money and we had collected $2200 in one afternoon. My lovely, patient husband asked, ” Do I get you back now?”. Planning this event, whilst enjoyable, was very time consuming.

My middle son who has Type 1 diabetes came up, gave me the kind of cuddle that melts a mother’s heart, and said,  “Thank you, mum”.

On Monday morning I arrived at work with lots of leftover cakes and goodies. Many happy faces and a few extra dollars were collected. I basked in my little bubble of contentment when a work colleague, a lovely, normally witty man, reached past me, grabbed some cake, asking, “This won’t give me diabetes will it?”

Back in the real world now, I looked him straight in the eye and said, “That is not funny on any level, ever!” He later came and apologised. I don’t blame him but perhaps I can help educate him.

I am still feeling wonderful. Lots of money has been raised for a good cause. I’ve realised how lucky I am to be surrounded by great people. My son lives in this same community and I feel there are more people around him now who understand better. 

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Ma Wee Scones

  ‘Ma wee scone’ ( my little scone) was a term of endearment used by old ladies in Scotland when I was growing up. You’d hear old ladies in the street looking at children : “Look at that poor wee scone over there, fell over his wellies and skint his knee!”. It fills me with nostalgia to think of it!

Now to life in Australia and I’m practising recipes for the fundraiser I’m hosting for JDRF  on 21 November. 

The boys are very willing guinea pigs. Everything has to be in mini versions as it’s a high tea. I’ve always avoided making scones due to that rubbing in of butter palaver but, to my astonishment, after a big day at work, I’m finding it quite therapeutic! 

I’m onto my second batch today. Twenty eight little beauties of around 15g of carb each. Pure butter and some of the weekend’s rhubarb and strawberry compote make it all worthwhile!

Now I’m mum to three wee ( OK, not so wee really! ) scones of my own. It’s funny how life can come the full circle!